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"On all sides round a great furnace flamed", German attack, North Compiegne, France
"On all sides round a great furnace flamed", German attack, North Compiegne, France
Title"On all sides round a great furnace flamed", German attack, North Compiegne, France
Date of Original191-
DescriptionSlight elevated view of trenches with soldiers in them. In distance is large plumes of smoke.
Ordering InformationConsult: http://library.ndsu.edu/ndsuarchives/duplication-services
General SubjectMilitary
Subject (LCTGM)Trench warfare
Military personnel
Smoke
Subject (LCSH)World War, 1914-1918 - Trench warfare
World War, 1914-1918
Soldiers - France
LocationCompiegne (France)
France
Decade1910-1919
Item Number2030.6.5
Format of OriginalStereographs
Gelatin silver prints
Dimensions of Original9 x 18 cm.
Publisher of OriginalKeystone View Company
Place of PublicationMeadville (Pa.)
Transcription"French trenches, north Compiegne, France. The men in the trenches before us are waiting the signal to go 'over the top' in attack. The barrage which precedes the attack has already reduced the trees in the distance to mere splintered trunks. It moves onward yard by yard very much as a fire sweeps the plain, covering every foot of the ground with a rain of death. Bursting shells drive the enemy from his trenches into the dugouts, huge shells sometimes demolishing the latter and smothering the men who sought refuge in them. The signal for these men to attack will be given when the barrage has passed over the enemy trench and before its defenders can swarm out from their dugouts to defend them. It is of the utmost importance to get proper co-cordination between the infantry attack and the barrage; if the men attack too soon they will be killed by the bursting shells of their own barrage, if they wait too long, the enemy will have had time to come out from their dugouts, line the trenches, and mow down the attackers with bomb and bullet. Hundreds and hundreds of miles of trenches like these were dug across Northern France. Parallel lines of them extended from Switzerland to the North Sea. And back of them in many places lay other parallel lines of supporting trenches. From the fall of 1914 to the fall of 1918 millions of men occupied these trenches, relieveing each other in relays, repulsing raiding parties, going 'over the top' at zero hour in the morning, or ceaselessly alert, guarding the lines from capture. The trenches were zigzagged in order to minimize the loss when under bombardment, if dug in a straight line a bursting shell would fly a long distance, killing or wounding many men, whereas in these its range of action was restricted"--Printed on back of stereograph.
V18879."
NotesTitle printed on front of stereograph.
Photographer unknown.
Repository InstitutionNorth Dakota State University Libraries, Institute for Regional Studies
Repository CollectionWorld War I Stereograph Collection 2030
Collection Finding AidConsult: http://hdl.handle.net/10365/1206
Credit LineInstitute for Regional Studies, NDSU, Fargo (2030.6.5)
Languageeng
Digital IDrs001211
Original SourceStereograph
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